Location: Sturbridge, MA
Client: Joshua Hyde Public Library
Interior Design: Kimberly Bolan Associates
Population Served: 8,000
Completion Date: June 2013

Children and parents could not be happier with their new space at the Joshua Hyde Public Library! Prior to this renovation, the children’s room hadn’t seen any significant updates since it was first built in 1989, an expansion to the library, then 93 years old. Half of the cost of the renovation, which totaled approximately $105,000, was funded by the city of Sturbridge while the remaining balance was raised through private donations and the critical fundraising efforts put forth by the Friends of the Library.

The goals of this renovation were to create a brighter, more welcoming and user-friendly room that would feature their collection beautifully while also providing furnishings that meet the needs of a wide age range. Patricia Lalli, children’s librarian at Joshua Hyde Public Library, said “Older students are excited about their own area featuring window seats and board games. It’s a place they can call their own.”

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Because high shelving no longer blocks the windows, natural light shines in on the brightly colored walls and furniture, offering a much more welcoming environment. Face-out picture book browsers are just the right height for young readers and offer easy access to the library’s large collection.  These ColorScape browsers can also be rolled away to provide ample room for other programming. CD’s and DVD’s are neatly organized on Demco’s TotaLibra steel shelving and patrons can now easily find what they’re looking for.

All in all, the library and its patrons are very pleased with the outcome of their new children’s room. Reflecting on all the radical updates in her new children’s room Lalli agrees, “We were looking for the ‘Wow!’ factor and I think we succeeded!”